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Canon Law - 2.4 - The Parochial Clergy

 
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MessagePosté le: Lun Mar 03, 2008 11:52 pm    Sujet du message: Canon Law - 2.4 - The Parochial Clergy Répondre en citant

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The Parochial Clergy

The religious parish is a geographic subdivision of a diocese.

In the Aristotelian church, the parish designates both a precise geographic area, the "parochial territory," and a group of people living within this territory who constitute the parochial community.

The word comes from the Latin, parochia, used by the first Aristotelian communities to designate the territory of an Episcopal city. Around the fifth century, it was already very near to its actual meaning since it applied to the territories and communities of the Episcopal see.

It is possible to belong to several parishes, but, at the administrative level, one depends directly on the communal parish of his principle residence (the one shown in his profile).

There are three types of parishes which all depend on a bishop, who is thus the direct religious superior responsible for the parishes.

A clerk can be responsible for several parishes, but he must be installed in them by the same bishop. Indeed, a clerk responsible for the parish cannot be supervised by multiple bishops. This is true for the deacons and the vicars of the parish, as well as for the assistants, because they are indirectly under the authority of the same bishop as their direct superior.

Priests, deacons, vicars, almoners and chaplains cannot administer the sacraments outside of the parish in which they are established without the authorization of their bishop AND the person responsible for the parish in question.


1) The urban parish

The urban parish is necessarily in a city or an open village, referred to as a parish and containing a church, a town hall, homes, and a market.

The parish church is the gathering place of the community in which the priest and his assistants celebrate different ceremonies, including the two weekly masses.
The urban parish can have only three responsible parties recognized as such.
The urban parish may be headed by a priest, a vicar, or a deacon.
The person responsible for the parish can have two assistants, either deacons or vicars.
Supplementary assistants, such as acolytes, vergers, and sacristans, are not considered clerks, and, even though the agreement of the bishop is necessary to confirm them, they are under the direct supervision of the parish authority who named them.
Only the priest can confess in the parish church (obligatory IG limitation).
He can name three confessors (IG), who can listen to confession of the faithful but can only give absolution with respect to the Canon Law.

Priest



The material cause = he must be a priest and theologian of the Aristotelian Church (level 3, church way)
The efficient cause = he is nominated by an archbishop or bishop responsible for the community or town parish in question.
The formal cause = he is ordained by the archbishop or bishop responsible for the parish in question.

The final cause:

The priest can administer all of the Aristotelian sacraments except for ordination.
He had been charged (in role-play and IG) with the religious, economic and administrative management of his parish.
He can name two clerks to aid him as needed, either vicars or deacons, and as many assistants as he desires, insofar as they are approved by his bishop.
He can name three Confessors (IG) for his parish (not yet coded).

Multiple offices: The priesthood is a primary office. The priest cannot also serve an additional primary office.

Deacons and Vicars

Vicar Deacon


The material cause = he must be a faithful member of the Church. If he is ordained, the deacon carries the title of vicar.
The efficient cause = he is nominated by the parish priest with the agreement of his bishop (or archbishop).
The formal cause = he is instated by his parish priest or by the bishop (or archbishop).
The final cause = he is responsible for the religious management of the parish where he is named.

The deacons and vicars can administer all of the Aristotelian sacraments except for ordination.
They cannot name confessors nor other members of the parish clergy. They depend directly on the parish priest or, in his absence, on the bishop.

Multiple offices: deacons and vicars hold secondary offices, with regards to the rules of multiple offices. Deacons and vicars may hold an additional secondary office or a primary office in the secular clergy, but only if this office reports to the same bishop. A cardinal or bishop in partibus may serve as vicar however.

Sacristain (acting as priest).



The material cause = he must be baptized and a theologian of the Aristotelian Church (level 3, church way).
The efficient cause = he is nominated by the archbishop or bishop responsible for the community or town parish in question.
The formal cause = he is established by the archbishop or bishop responsible for the parish in question.

The final cause:

As much as possible, it is necessary to avoid giving sacristans a permanent assignment. They should be used only to compensate for an absent priest.
The sacristan is responsible for the sacristy and thus prepares the office for the officiant.
There are two types of sacristans: the simple faithful and the deacons.

a) The simple faithful.

If the sacristan is a simple faithful, he isn't considered as a clerk and cannot assert himself as such. At all times in public, he must act as a good Aristotelian and not dishonor his charge in any manner, under penalty of excommunication.
He must redirect requests for a sacrament towards a clerk who can take care of them.

b) Deacons or vicars.

If he is a deacon serving also as a Sacristan, he keeps the title of Deacon and all that is attached to it.
If a vicar assumes the responsibility, he becomes a priest for the time of the nomination.

Multiple offices: So long as he is a sacristan, the clerk is subject to the same prohibitions regarding multiple offices as the priest, thus it is a primary office.

Note: The Sacristan must explain his status with a visible posting at the entrance to the church.

The Acolytes

The material cause = he must be a faithful of a the Church.
The efficient cause = he is nominated by the parish priest with the agreement of his bishop (or archbishop).
The formal cause = he is engaged by the parish priest or by his bishop (or archbishop).
The final cause =

He receives a specific mission from his superior. This is generally a faithful desiring to inform himself religiously before becoming a deacon or vicar.
According to his mission, he carries a specific title such as sacristan, verger, messenger, intendant, etc.
He is not considered as a clerk and is under the direct supervision of the one who named him.

Multiple offices: not being clerks in their function as acolytes, they are not subject to the prohibitions regarding multiple offices.

Parish Confessor (IG)

The material cause = he must be a theologian of the Church.
The efficient cause = he is named by the parish priest.
The formal cause = he is established by the parish priest.
The final cause = he is responsible for IG confessions of the parish in which he is named. He can give role-played absolution only if he is a priest.

Multiple offices: Not being clerks with regard to their function as confessors (IG), they are not subject to the prohibitions regarding multiple offices.


2) The noble parish (fief)

The noble parish is necessarily an estate, referred to as a fief (stronghold) and containing a chapel and at least one residence.
The noble parish must be attached to a diocese, preferably nearby geographically speaking, but the noble proprietor of the noble parish can choose his bishop, in mutual agreement, from among the national bishops, cardinals included. At the same time, the same prelate must not have in his charge more fiefs than he can manage honestly.

The chapel is the gathering place of the proprietors and their guests, in which the chaplain and his assistants conduct various ceremonies.
The noble parish can have only one responsible person recognized as such.
The noble parish can be headed by a chaplain, ordained or not.
Supplementary assistants, such as acolytes, vergers, and sacristans, are not regarded as clerks. They are under the direct authority of the chaplain and can only practice within the territory of the noble parish.

Chaplain


or

The material cause = he must be a faithful member of the Church, accredited by the congregation for the diffusion of the faith.
The efficient cause = he is engaged by a faithful of the nobility.
The formal cause = he is instated and under the authority of the bishop of the diocese on which the fief depends.
According to gender, he is called Brother or Sister Chaplain if he is lay; if he is a priest, Father or Mother Chaplain.

The final cause:

He is responsible for religious management (in RP) of the fiefs where he is named (the fiefs must depend on the same bishop).
He can administer all the Aristotelian sacraments except for ordination.
He cannot name confessors or another member of the parish clergy. He depends directly on the bishop who named him.

Multiple offices: Chaplains hold secondary offices with regard to the regulations of multiple offices. They can hold also an additional secondary office or a primary office in the secular clergy, but only if this additional charge depends on the same bishop.
A cardinal or bishop in partibus could be a chaplain, however.


3) Community parish.

In certain cases, communities, associations, and brotherhoods (seen as guilds or military groups) may need a religious guide in their ranks.
These corporations must be presented to the bishop of their region who can assign them a religious overseer who carries the title of almoner.

Almoner (except Religious Military Order)

or

The material cause = he must be a faithful member of the Church, accredited by the congregation for the diffusion of the faith.
The efficient cause = he is engaged by a civil or military lay group.
The formal cause = this depends on the group in which the almoner is installed and is defined by the congregation for the diffusion of the faith.
According to gender, he is called Brother or Sister Almoner if he is lay; if he is a priest, Father or Mother Almoner.

The final cause:

He is responsible for the religious management (in RP) of the group in which he is named.
He can administer all of the Aristotelian sacraments except for ordination.
He cannot name confessors or other members of the parish clergy. He depends administratively on the congregation of the faith.

Multiple offices: Almoners hold a secondary office according to the regulations of multiple offices.
The almoner may hold also another secondary office or a primary office in the secular clergy, but only if his offices depend on the same bishop.
A cardinal or bishop in partibus could be an almoner, however.

Community parish with national vocation:
If the community has vocation to be national, it depends directly on the primate or, if there is one, on the clerk responsible for the almoners.

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