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The Life of Christos
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Apocas
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:52 am    Sujet du message: The Life of Christos Répondre en citant

The Life of Christos, Prophet, Messiah and Founder of the Aristotelian Church.

Translated by Venerable Wheeler, Mother Arynna, and the members of the Ordre of Saint Jérôme and released unto the English speaking faithful, May 1455.

Table of Contents

Prologue
Chapter I (The Child was born in Bethlehem, in Judæa)
Chapter II (The Flight into Cyprus)
Chapter III (His childhood in Nazareth)
Chapter IV (Travels in Judæa, first sermons)
Chapter V (Retreat in the desert and the meeting with the Creature Without Name)
Chapter VI (The first disciples)
Chapter VII (The Twelve which defended Christόs)
Chapter VIII (The institution of the Twelve Apostles)
Chapter IX (Christόs spreads the Good News)
Chapter X (The arrival in Jérusalem)
Chapter XI (The création of the Church with Titus and the other Apostles)
Chapter XII (The confession and the baptism of the Centurion)
Chapter XIII (Natchiatchia, and the marriage)
Chapter XIV (The Last Supper and the betrayal of Daju)
Chapter XV (The judgement and the Crucifixion)
Chapter XVI (His death and élévation to paradise)
Epilogue

The 21 Logia of Christos
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Former Bishop of Clifton
Former Roman Cardinal-Elector and Prélate Plénipotentiary
Former Cardinal Chamberlain of England, Scotland, and Ireland


Dernière édition par Apocas le Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:27 am; édité 1 fois
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:53 am    Sujet du message: Prologue Répondre en citant

The Life of Christos

Prologue

by Samoht, year 87.

Here, my brothers, is the heritage that I pass on to you, in the form of these scrolls of parchment.

I, Samoht, an old man who hopes soon to be recalled by The Most High to join Him in His Kingdom, have consigned here all my memories of the one named as Joshua but called Christos, who marked the world indelibly with the print of his foot.

You know of him, my dear children, this thin, beautiful, great man who traversed the deserts, stick in his hand, radiating a divine happiness. He taught the message of Aristotle to all men to save them from their own iniquities. He was the much-awaited Messiah, our so much hoped-for guide.

You know him, you who already heard so many testimonies about his life, sometimes divergent, often mysterious, but all agreeing on the exceptional destiny of this man inhabited by God.

Now, my strength has left me, my friends, and I feel that I might not last the winter. So, I purposed to tell you his history as much as I lived it, a long time ago. I worked like a slave, through the night, by the gleam of a candle. I dug deep into my memories to make certain that everything written here is true and accurate, and removed every thought that time had changed or embellished.

And yet, even after taking these precautions, his life seems to me like a mirage, a dazzling dream, a mystery of exciting beauty and melancholic drama. Alas, today, bowing low even when standing upright, adorning myself with my cane, when I finally rise on my frail legs to admire the beauty of creation, I cannot prevent myself from choking a sob; the sunlight of this day appears still impressed, body and soul, with Christos.

Nature also testifies to the power and kindness of The Most High. As for life, it is in itself a proof of this so disconcerting transcendence.

My tears of joy are intended for God, as thanks for having created us and for the enormous gift that He gave us by sending the Messiah to show us the way. I can also, my brothers, now cry in happiness for reading these lines, proof that I have not failed in the mission which Christos himself gave to me so many decades ago.

Thus, three centuries after Aristotle revealed the divine word, those who had faith in the Eternal were still confronted with the absolute power of various pagan religions that sacrificed to their many false gods, some of which had even adapted the lessons of Aristotle for better diverting their truth. But the true faith did not miss the hearts of the men and women of the time, and they were confronted each day with the erroneous convictions of these sinners. All believing truths waited until the prophecy of Aristotle was made manifest and the Messiah was able to confirm the message of the Eternal…
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:53 am    Sujet du message: Chapter I Répondre en citant

Chapter 1

When I knew Christos, he liked to speak to us for hours on end, with a voice impassioned and enthralling. We drank in his words with enthusiasm and nourished our hearts with them. It was at the time of one of these long discussions that Christos told us of his childhood. Thus, I report it to you, my children, because this part of his life was as beautiful as that which I lived through at his side.

Maria lived with Joseph, whom she was going to marry. Both were humble vagrants, but they lived in virtue, thanking The Most High for every terrestrial benefit that they enjoyed. Moreover, they had, each for the other, a love sincere and pure of any lust, and their life was happy. But one day, Maria saw in her dreams a rider coming from far away to meet with her. He arrived in front of her house and dismounted. He was a man of majestic demeanor; he advanced, and said:

“Maria, do not fear, because the Eternal loves you and has chosen you for a wonderful work. A child will be born from you, and you will name him Joshua. He will be a guide, a Messiah inhabited by God. He will carry the word of God everywhere he goes and will save the people from their sins by teaching the wisdom of Aristotle to them.”

The rider then set out again, back toward the remote region he had come from. Maria awoke at this time and saw Joseph in front of her, looking at her with eyes of love.

And it occurred as the dream had announced. Maria delivered a child, and all occurred according to the prophecy of Aristotle, his parents naming him Joshua.

The child was born in Bethlehem, in Judea. Because of the overpopulation that existed in this city, the couple found only one dilapidated shack in which to rest, for there was no place to accommodate them elsewhere. But when the child was born, he seemed, to all those who saw him, touched by divine grace, because he radiated gentleness and calm. So the people of the small village made donations so that this blessed child of God should have all that was necessary for him. Some brought linens, others helped to repair the shack, and still others brought food and clothing to the two happy parents.

Maria was transfigured by happiness. Her joy made her luminous and she thanked The Most High each day thereafter for the birth of this child.

It is in this calm and peaceful place that Joshua began his life, far from any violence or perversion… until…
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:54 am    Sujet du message: Chapter II Répondre en citant

Chapter 2

Maria was too happy to be the mother of him who was going to become the Messiah to hold her tongue. One day, when she was going to seek water at the fountain, she crossed paths with a courtesan of the King of Judea called Elitobias.

Elitobias, a scholar of the way of the State serving with much zeal, lived in immodest luxury, nourishing herself on meat, fish, and milk. She was accustomed to making fun of the poverty of Maria. To her, she said, “I serve the greatest King of this region, our beloved Mistral IV. ”

Then Maria made an error. Not being able any longer to support the sarcastic remarks of Elitobias, she answered her: “As for me, I am the mother of the Messiah, Joshua, who will carry the message of Aristotle and who will dethrone all your unnecessary kings and your unnecessary prophets. Mistral IV is a temporary King, for my son will exceed him in charisma and his name will remain engraved in the memory for far longer than your King.”

Then Elitobias, who believed in dreams and in the signs of destiny, was disturbed. She returned hastily to the palace of Mistral IV to warn her Master.

Mistral IV was a man like marble, a statue polished by the patina of time. He was dark, a widower, inconsolable in his sadness and distant from all. As a prince, he had fought off the Medians thanks to an astute system of pulleys and carts. But his glory had since become quite pale, and he had become a quiet and detached king of miseries to his people. Jealous of his power, he claimed to direct his subjects but left in fact his intriguing wife to control the kingdom. He never left the luxury of his palace anymore, except to repress a plot or to put down an uprising.

When he caused Elitobias, for whom he had a guilty inclination, to tell what she had heard, he was surprised. Then, he asked her: “Who is this country bumpkin who is named Joshua and who will save his people? Where could I find him? In which market? In which restaurant?”

Elitobias continued her speech of denunciation then, hoping to thus earn for herself a reward from this coldly attractive King.

“According to what Maria said to me, Joshua is the Messiah, the guide, the mirror of the divinity. He was announced by Aristotle and, according to prophecy, he will bring to all men fine words and will confirm the Aristotelian precepts. His influence will be great and he will have many disciples, who will recognize themselves in him and in Aristotle for the millennia to come. You will be able to find him in Bethlehem.”

With these words, Mistral felt arising in him his old superstitions, as well as the memory of the faith which he had once known but had repressed and drowned in his heart. He was afraid to lose his throne and took this threat very seriously. He called his guards, and told them:

“Guards, a man has just been born, who could speak out against me. It is necessary at all costs to prevent this man from so speaking. He is in Bethlehem. Find him and assassinate him! Use even my system of pulleys and carts if necessary!”

Then, the guard of the king was escorted out, and journeyed towards Bethlehem.

But on this night, Maria had a dream again. She saw again the rider that had announced the birth of Joshua. He reappeared before Maria and said to her: “Rise! Take Joshua with you, and go. Go north, towards the Island of Cyprus, and remain there until you are called to return for Mistral wishes to kill the little child. ”

Then, the parents rose, took from their shack the loaves of bread and ears of corn which remained to them and left on the roads, heading north, while passing by Tarotshé. They left the borders of the country and remained in Cyprus for as long as the threat thundered.

Mistral IV, learning from his guards that the parents had fled the country, became furious, and shouted: “Guards, this Joseph and this Maria are agitators! They defied me and are now guilty of treason by refusing my royal edict! Eradicate them immediately! As for this line of… of… it must be broken. Go and find all the children of less than two years, and eradicate them, with the catapult if it is needed.”

Then, the famous armies of Mistral, those whom he was able to assemble in only a few hours, were off moving, combing all the countryside. They surveyed each market, each restaurant, leaving messages in which they asked the population to bring to the authorities all the children of less than two years, to count them, so they said.

And the common people, innocently, brought their children or their grandchildren to the authorities without realizing the drama that was playing out. Tears were shed and cries of anguish were heard, and one saw blood, sweat and tears. These guards, which were dreadful, dirty and malicious, cut the throats of these young innocent souls in front of the eyes of their own parents.

And the dark one, from the top of his throne, silently looked at the massacre, cold and distant. After this crisis, the king fell down in his silence, lethargic, so that he forgot, in later years, to feed and lost strength. He became weak, then skeletal, and finally died.

In Cyprus, Joshua’ parents learned of Mistral’s death and thought that the child’s life was no longer threatened. Then, Joseph and Maria decided to return to Judea, however, they chose not to call their son Joshua but Christos, to not draw attention to him. They took from their shack the loaves of bread and corn ears that remained to them and left on the roads heading south, while passing by Tarotshé. They arrived finally in a city called Nazareth, again fulfilling the prophecy of Aristotle.
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Former Cardinal Chamberlain of England, Scotland, and Ireland
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:55 am    Sujet du message: Chapter III Répondre en citant

Chapter 3

Christos thus passed his childhood in the village of Nazareth where he was raised by his father, Joseph (a carpenter) and his mother, Maria.

As Christos was an exemplary child and full of love, he was liked by all in the vicinity. Also, a woman, surpassing all others in benevolence, offered a small kitchen garden to the couple. Thus, while Joseph was going to cut wood in the neighbouring forest, Maria cultivated vegetables. This healthy food seemed to work wonders on Christos, who, throughout his childhood, showed an extraordinary charisma for so young a child. His words were of gold and, when he spoke, all listened to him with attention, without daring to interrupt.

And Maria, who continued her vegetable harvests, could soon afford to buy a small meadow where some sheep could graze peacefully.

Christos liked to deal with these placid animals. When others asked him why, asserting the painful labour that it required, Christos answered: “God gave work to us so that each day we could deserve the title of ‘Child of God.’ He granted to us that we should rank above the animals and be the only recipients of the gift of the language, because we are the only able ones to love Him as He loves us. I like these rams and these ewes, not hoping that they return it to me, but because they result, like us, from The Most High. ”

Christos often helped his father to transport wood home from the market, and there he watched Joseph working the wood and giving it form. One day, Christos said: “This wood which you plane and which you cut to make frames is like an image of the world. Like this wood, the world becomes as we ourselves make it, so we must work it with love and attention. The men are frames, and I would make these frames the ridge of my Church.”

Maria prepared a meal by mixing stale bread with corn and milk, the whole boiled in an earthenware jar. Christos said to her: “This dish which you prepare, this food which you mix together is an image of the people. Because we must mix together to form and release this perfume of happiness.”

In their turn, Joseph and Maria taught their child the principles of virtue. Christos showed in this field an extraordinary receptivity. He did not only understand these precepts: he lived them fully. He breathed virtue and all the inhabitants of the village were inspired by his example.

Christos loved to walk in the countryside and the deserts, to spend time in the middle of nature, admiring the beauty of creation. He parted high grasses, and stood in the dust of the dunes. He walked the paths, climbed the mountains and contemplated the world, admiring its harmony and the fitting of its elements. Perhaps even then he thought of the primary causes of all this beauty?

Thus he passed his childhood, and grew, surrounded by people whom he loved.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:56 am    Sujet du message: Chapter IV Répondre en citant

Chapter 4

Having reached the age of manhood, Christos decided to leave his parents so as to traverse the world and help its people. He left home with mature ideas on the precepts of Aristotle and the message of God.

Having bid his parents farewell, he ventured out into the country of Judea. He went on precipitous paths, climbed mountains, descended into plains, and crossed rivers.

During his travels, he met many people, often dressed in rags, who sought in travel and in meditation a means of arriving at a fuller truth. Christos stopped to talk with many of these people, growing rich by their experiences and their humanity.

But he saw also the eccentric and the extravagant, the insane and the recluses. In short, he saw a number of vagrants refusing, due to a hatred of mankind, the company and the life of the City.

Then, he tried to approach these human poor; he spoke to them and explained the philosophy of Aristotle and the lesson of The Most High to them.

“Aristotle,” he said, “taught us that the wise man must take part in the life of the City. You, my friends, look at yourselves. Are you happy? Do you know what it means to be human in the middle of nowhere? My friends know that Man by nature is made to live with his neighbours. ”

Having said this, Christos moderated his words, all the same:

“But do not forget that each man has also an individuality, each man has his own relationship with God and with nature. Do not forget that. Find for yourselves the time and the resources necessary for reflection. From time to time withdraw yourselves, beyond the city, in order to find yourselves anew, in prayer and meditation. The quietude and the concentration of your spirit will assist you to reflect God’s love back to Him. The retirements are then a means for you to take retreat from the city, for better contemplating it and better appreciating it.“

His force of persuasion was such that all those who crossed his path were convinced. And, after having spoken with Christos, they returned to their cities and caused among townsmen surprise and joy.

Indeed, times were hard, and each one awaited the arrival of a Messiah. However, these days, many returned to their premises while saying: “Christos, our saviour, arrived, as it is known in the prophecy of Aristotle.”

But Christos felt in himself the need to withdraw for a time to collect himself. So, he was isolated from the world while walking in the desert. His spiritual retreat lasted for forty days.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:56 am    Sujet du message: Chapter V Répondre en citant

Chapter 5

Joshua had been in the desert for several days already, drinking his water and eating the grasshoppers from the sand, when, tired, the desire to lie down and move no further filled him. It seemed to him that a mysterious force said to him:

“Stop, Christos, line of Joseph, for you are tired. If you desire it, you may turn back and return to your home without any further exhaustion.”

It was the creature without a name, it that had lived in the darkness for millennia. It did not want that, through Christos, word of the love of God would be spread. It had decided to corrupt Christos in order to divert him from his righteous mission. If the roots of the tree blackened, then it would never bear fruits.

Christos answered, without anger: “Get away from me, you who want me to lose myself in idleness. I will continue because the world belongs to those who rise early!”

And the temptation to rest was dissipated at that moment.

Then, as Joshua fasted for days, he became more and more hungry. His belly felt painful to him, and desire came upon him to open the last provisions that remained to him in his sheepskin bag. The creature without name, endowed with an exceptional charisma, said to him:

“Open your bag, Christos, line of Joseph, because you are hungry. Thus eat this meat and this bread that await you… you will always be able to eat the grasshoppers later. Think of your current hunger.”

Christos answered again without anger: “Get away, you who want me to lose myself in greediness. I would not open my bag because the world belongs to those who can endure hunger.”

Then, as Christos was in the beautiful landscape of the desert, he was tired, he was hungry and his body hurt him. Suddenly, by fixing the horizon in front of him, he saw the impression of an oasis. It was a small lake surrounded by green bushes. The oasis was still far away, but cries of joy seemed to escape from it. Christos recognized soon silhouettes of naked women bathing in this water. The honeyed voice of the creature without name said to him:

“Why do you hesitate, Christos, line of Joseph, to join them? Do you not hear them? These beautiful women who call you? They are here for you! And so beautiful, my goodness! ”

Christos answered, without anger: “Get you away, you spirit of vice, who wants to drown me in lust. I would not divert from my path, because, as true as I say it to you, this oasis and these women will disappear from my sight.”

And indeed, soon, the image of the oasis was dissipated, leaving Christos seeing only the desert extending to the horizon.

Then, as Joshua continued to go, without looking behind, he suddenly saw in front of him the image of a large city. This city was splendid, the walls and the battlements did not hide its richness. Its houses, decorated with gold and precious stones, seemed to shine with a thousand fires. A dome rose from above the city, exceeding all others. It was the palace of the mayor. The soft voice of the creature without name called to Christos:

“See this beautiful city? Think of its riches! With the talents you have, you could become the mayor of it if you desire. Because, in truth, you were able to fast during all these days, like resisting tiredness and lust; your force of character could take you alongside the Most High! ”

Then Christos answered him, without putting himself in anger:
“Get away, malignant spirit which wants to lose me in pride, desire and avarice. I would also resist these sins there, because he is small who yields to his impulses.”

Then the creature without name cried out: “God made us His children because we are the strongest of His creatures. Among us, I am His preferred, because I am the strongest of us all. I alone understood that the strong were always to dominate the weak, just as you men dominate the cows, the pigs and the sheep. God gave us His creation to experience the thousand pleasures of the body and the spirit that we deserve. How is it possible to better pay homage to Him than in appreciating the pleasures of His creation?”

But Christos retorted: “Go away, tempter! Your presence among creation is an insult unto God. Know you that you are not His preferred. He relegated you to the darkness, because you were diverted from His light. He left you your existence only in order to test the faith of His children.”

And he added: “God made us His children because we are the only ones with understanding that, as He loves us, so He desires our love in return. He did not give you this status, shameful creature, because you do not have a soul, because your heart is black like jet. Admittedly, the world, created by God, offers a thousand pleasures and more. Admittedly, we pay homage to Him in knowing to appreciate them with their right value. But these pleasures must be tasted and not devoured. Only virtue, such as was taught to us by Aristotle the prophet, allows us to appreciate these worldly pleasures without falling into vice and sin.”

He concluded finally: “This is because sin is the negation of divine perfection. Total abandonment to the many pleasures is accompanied by diversion from the love of God, whereas the measured taste of the pleasures of divine creation can be done only in the love of its creator. Now take yourself away from me!”

At once, the creature without name, that had crawled at Joshua’s side, disappeared, leaving him alone at the edge of the desert. He had crossed this country of temptations in forty days.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:57 am    Sujet du message: Chaper VI Répondre en citant

Chapter 6

In those times, the world was in crisis. Many pagan religions abounded. Also, certain men had forgotten the precepts of Aristotle and worshiped false idols. Others, gathered in a powerful Church, claimed they followed Aristotle but had diverted his message or failed to comprehend it. Fortunately, there were still people who lived in the virtue such as it was taught by our first prophet.

It should be known, my children, that neither the powerful Church of which I spoke to you, nor the worship of idols, answered the multitude’s thirst for the divine. Thus, the inhabitants of the country of Judea lived in a state of permanent sin and diverted more and more their eyes from the transcendence of the Almighty.

There were still some people who tried to gather men of goodwill, but the majority wallowed in indecent assault and fornication. This life of pleasure added to the preference of the people for individualism rather than for communion and communication. Many lost souls wanted to turn to their spiritual guide, the highest priest of the country, the chief of all the priests, but this one remained silent before them.

He was a man of few words, who answered each question, laconically, “Do not be afraid, open your arms to Aristotle. ”

Christos, after his test in the desert, had returned to civilization, and preached the good news and the message of Aristotle in many places in the villages. He said: “Repent! Confess your sins, for The Most High does not like to see vice having invaded and conquered the cities of Men. ”

Several people listened to his speech. Two of them, a craftsman and his apprentice, were struck by the accuracy of his words. These were Titus, and your servant, Samoht.

We approached Christos, accompanied soon by our friend Paulos, though we were but peasants. I was youngest, still little more than a child… but it was I that spoke: “Teacher, your words are so right, please tell us of the message of Aristotle! ”

Then Christos, touched by my youthful innocence, answered us: “Then follow me. Your trades, your goods, your tools must wait until you finish your mission. Because, for the time being, I will have you build in the Church the most beautiful instrument of peace the world has ever known. I would teach you the wisdom of Aristotle and the message of God, but you will have to learn altruism and self-sacrifice.”

We joined a large crowd, all on the way to the large basilica in which the chief of all the priests resided. The man was deep asleep before an amazed assembly that watched for the least movement of eyelid or nostrils, awaiting the ceremony he was to have performed.

Christos, accompanied by his three companions, entered the room and declared: “You, man of little faith, why do you delay those who come before you with aspirations of believing? Why don't you answer their anguish? ”

Christos turned to us, and declared: “Mark it well: This man represents the vice infiltrated into the very heart of the temple of God. He is your image, my friends, who in your souls as creatures of God know also the sin. See, that which does not move even the smallest finger; that one does not deserve to be a king. And you, king of believing, what do you do? Do you not see that your Church falls apart all around you? Don't you hear the cries of the lost souls which call to you for aid from without your palace walls?”

Awaked by the voice of Christos, the large priest, miserly of words, but who did not choose them well, rose and cried out: “And why is this fellow not captured? You are not content but to break in, my goodness! It is necessary to see to it that you are not starting too much to bust my chops as well!”

At these words, Christos turned back towards his disciples, and said to them:

“In truth, I say to you; it is better to hear than to be deaf! This man falls into the excesses denounced by Aristotle, remaining quiet most of the time, yet when he does speak, saying too much. He does not know the virtue of temperance, nor the principle of the happy medium.”
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:57 am    Sujet du message: Chapter VII Répondre en citant

Chapter 7

Ah, I would always remember this day, my friends. After we left the Basilica, we found ourselves face to face with a group of idlers who declaimed sharply one against the other. We tried to restrain Christos, but he did not listen to us and approached this group of quarrelers.

He readily understood the cause of the conflict before him; a sheep was lost, terrorized by the cries which came from all sides. On his left were followers of the pagan religions, their priest at the head, holding in his hand a long knife. On the other side stood some who were disappointed by paganism and who, somewhat less diverted from the precepts of Aristotle than the first, had massed to denounce the barbarian sacrifice which was being prepared in the honor of the false gods. Each camp howled with vehemence against the other.

Then, Christos called out, calmly, to the terrorized animal, which advanced submissively towards him. Christos cherished it, then told it to go on its way. The sheep left then. But the pagan priest was filled with rage against Christos and advanced toward him, knife raised in the air. At this point in time we interposed ourselves between them, Titus, Paulos, and myself, joined soon by nine others of these disappointed which had been assembled on the right. But Christos advanced and faced the priest alone. This one gazed sternly into the eyes of the Messiah, blanched, and left without a word, the crowd of pagans following with an air of embarrassment.

Then we twelve who had wanted to defend Christos, stupefied by what had just occurred, turned ourselves towards this great and mysterious man. One of us, a man that I did not know yet, but whose name was Thanos, said to him: “But who are you, you who calms the lamb and whose gentleness turns aside the pagan infamy? ”

Then Christ answered him: “My name is Christos, of the line of Joseph and Maria. Those who know me say of me that I am the Messiah, because I love God and my fellow human beings. ”

And we exclaimed: “In truth, none of us doubts this fact. Our thanks be to The Most High for having sent you to us, so that His word illuminates our lives and that the prophecy of Aristotle is realized. ”

And Christos answered finally: “In truth, it is quite sad that so many children of God are diverted from His love. It is necessary to guide them so that their errors are rectified. Will you follow me and make yourselves apostles of the word of God? ”

I looked to the nine which did not yet know Christos, who seemed as a group to be divided between joy and distress. And they asked of the Messiah what it was necessary to do to join him.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:58 am    Sujet du message: Chapter VIII Répondre en citant

Chapter 8

Ah, my children, Christos then illuminated us! His words remain engraved in my memory.

“My friends,” he said to us, “do not mistake! Those who do not live in the friendship taught to us by Aristotle will burn in the thousand flames of Gehenna. Those who yield themselves to experience the temptations of sin, those who do not know the virtue, these will finish in the suffering and the loneliness of Hell. Those who yield to the honeyed voice of sin, who are allured by its speech, these will accompany it in darkness. Those who, finally, reject the love of God and of their fellow human beings, who take refuge only in their own selfishness, these will finish in the infernal ruin. Also, take guard, my brothers and sisters, to be attentive and vigilant! Because no one knows the day when the prophecies will be carried out. No one knows the day and the hour of the end of time.”

We attentively listened to what he said, having the intuition that this day was decisive for our future lives. And the nine others that had interposed themselves remained still, mouths gaping in front of such an amount of truth and accuracy, in front of such a man.

Christos began again: “You wish to join me? In this case, have much love in your heart and follow me, giving a little of your time and your goods as you are able. On the other hand, if you choose to dedicate yourselves to guide others on the way of the Church, it is necessary rather to give God all priority. Then take distance from your goods, from your work, from your tools, say goodbye to your family… Prefer simplicity and instruction to the rich person’s ornaments and beautiful finery. Because our task will require us to sacrifice the personal good to the collective good, yet, in exchange, you grasp sanctity among the children of God.”

And he said, further: “If your family does not understand you, pray for them, because they are not sensitive to the message of God. If one engages you and attempts to initiate a struggle, do not be upset with him, and pray for him, because he is not sensitive to the message of God. If your friends restrain you, then involve them with you, so that they discover also the message of God.

The road will be long and torturous, the rough way, the remote horizon, the strong slope, but the sun that shines above will guide our steps. We will have problems, arguments, anger, passions, hesitations, but love and friendship will link us, and God Himself will support us.

If you want to live alone, to go wherever you wish, to eat and reason however you will, then nothing prevents you. Go your way and take refuge in the love of yourself. But if somebody strikes you, and you fall, then nobody will be there to assist you.

If you want to live in the group, in the love of your friends and of the multitude, if you want to divide your bread with your friends, to go with your brothers, then come to me and follow me. In this case, if you fall on the way, a brother will stop and help you.”

And we, his friends, listened to and approved Christos. We were from now on twelve to follow him. The six women were named Calandra, Adonia, Helene, Kyrène, Ophelia and Uriana. The six men were Daju, Thanos, Paulos, Nikolos, Titus, and Samoht, your servant.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:59 am    Sujet du message: Chapter IX Répondre en citant

Chapter 9

And it was in this manner, going from village to village, that Christos spread the good news to the crowds that would assemble. Each time, people were struck by the accuracy and power of his words, so that the fame of Christos the Galilean spread itself in the farthest reaches of the Earth, and the crowds came in increasing numbers to the places where Christos spoke.

He often said: “Love God as He loves you and live in all friendship with others, as taught to you by Aristotle,” or “Believe in the love that God carries for you, and love God in your turn. ”

And he would also say: “Your solidarity does not know a border! Remember, my friends, that Aristotle lived in a country of intolerance toward other people. Today, you must know that all the nations are entitled to respect, and their people to freedom and friendship.”

Lastly, he concluded: “In the same way, solidarity and friendship should not be constrained by a border between the sexes. Because the men as well as the women are children of God and, in that, they are equal.”

On the way, he met with many of the sick and the disabled, and we saw extraordinary things then: it was enough that Christos should touch a leprous or blind man that his disability would disappear. The sick felt alive again at his approach, and full of new hope. The mute began speaking, the deaf persons to hear, the blind men to see, the paralysed to walk, and all then blessed Christos and The Most High, praising them and thanking them with all their heart.

One day, our small troop of pilgrims collected a man suffering very badly, who had been attacked while on the road. The man did not have any more strength to go on. He had not drunk for a long time. Then Christos turned to the thirsty man, and said to him: “Light, Light, you are the light within the light. Your faith makes you luminous and saves you! ”

We did not have any water for the poor fellow, but Christos said to us: “It is not serious, he will simply have to drink from my hands. ” And, in fact, Christos knelt, joined his hands to make of them a kind of cup, and brought them toward the lips of the unhappy one. Then, an incredible miracle occurred, and the hands of Christos filled with water for the man to drink. He having then been refreshed, we hoisted him onto our shoulders and took him to the village where he lived.

And this is only one example of the many extraordinary things that Christos did when we accompanied him on his travels. These things he always did in the most natural way, whereas we were captivated by the power that God had placed in him. And we carried on our way, accompanied by the love and truth of our Messiah while he told us many parables which remain engraved in my memory and which I would like to also transmit to you, my friends, when the occasion is given me…

We approached Jerusalem, the large crawling city of a cosmopolitan and rich population of people.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 3:59 am    Sujet du message: Chapter X Répondre en citant

Chapter 10

We reached this large and beautiful city on a splendid day. I still see the sun beaming in my head, the soft light that my eyes would barely be able to see today. My spirit keeps this memory in a deep place.

We passed by the gates to venture into the middle of the city, coming to a great place swarming with activity. Indeed, this was where goods were exchanged, where multiple vendors sold fruits, vegetables, pieces of wood, or even items of clothing such as shoes, belts, and hats.

A deafening noise reigned in this place. And yet, when Christos went up to the central fountain and addressed himself to the population, everyone fell silent and soon heard nothing other than his clear and soft voice floating in the silence.

“Men and women of Jerusalem,” said he, “come to me and hear the word of God. He wants only to share with you His love. Love Him and He will fill you with joy, and this joy will be also in your souls. Divert yourselves from His love and He will be pained, and this sorrow will be to your greater suffering.”

Then, a crowd piled up around Christos and many were those that asked of him: “But who are you, foreigners, to know so well the love of God?”

Christos answered them: “I am Christos of Nazareth, the Messiah, guide and mirror of the divinity, inhabited by God. Aristotle the prophet announced my arrival, and now I show you the way to follow in order to live in the love of The Most High. ”

But some still doubted his words and said: “How do we know if you say true, or if your words are only honey intended to stop our ears and divert us from His true message? ”

Christos answered them: “See even yourselves, as you have kept yourselves silent as I have been speaking, and as you all are gathered here near me! Listen to your own hearts, which clamor for the faith that nourishes my words. Only look around you! In this crowd gathered close around me, many a disabled person has risen to come to listen to me, a number of the gravely ill have approached me, without realizing that they are finally and forever cured, a number of tired old men have found a new youth while listening to me. This is because God loves us, and those who listen to me and believe me are blessed of Him.”

Then everyone was amazed, and the news was spread in the entire city that Christos, announced by Aristotle, had finally arrived. Consequently, all those who had in them an unspecified trace of humanity and divinity, all those which had for a long time felt unease toward the head of the pagan worships, all these left their trades and sought to join the Messiah on the place to hear him speak.

So, then, at the end of a half hour, the streets were encumbered with the passers-by, one could not manage to circulate in the middle of the city while, yet, the edges were deserted. A passer-by could spend an hour to traverse a way that it spent five minutes to survey in the middle of the night, or in the little attended hours. And the guards had the greatest difficulty managing the problem.

But they were not all so, my children… ah, if you had seen that! If you had seen the taverns being emptied, this disorder being settled! Your youthful rebellion would have made you love this man who defied the established order! Imagine, my dear friends, all the abandoned activities? The paralysed city, the blocked economy?
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:00 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XI Répondre en citant

Chapter 11

And all the city was pressed around Christos. And he continued to speak, so quietly that it seemed remarkable that he could even be heard. But not a word of his was lost to the least of that multitude.

“See, this town of Jerusalem chokes by its lack of humanity. You have lost the values of division and friendship. But you have especially lost the most important among them all: fraternity! This city chokes for lack of love and charity! See the soup kitchen; who among you made food and gave bread to the vagrants?”

And the people lowered their eyes, ashamed as they were by this lack of generosity. One of them, who was named Natchatcha, raised toward the Messiah her pure face, and said to him: “Teacher, what do we have to do to live in the love of God? ”

Then, Christos answered her with a smile: “The faithful of God, those who learned the teachings of Aristotle and who want to follow the way that I show you, must form a community of life. This community will find its direction, and will allow each one to live in virtue, if he or she is plain in the shared friendship that each one of its members must test toward others in the community. To guide you, I would be the father of this community, I would set up the principles of it, and my successors will do so in the same way after me.”

Christos turned then to Titus, who was nearby, “Titus, approach, my friend. Titus, you are strong and vigorous. You can help me to carry this community; you will be my second. Now, Titus, you are Titan, and it is with the assistance of your strength that I would build a titanic Church! ”

And he turned to the other apostles, who grimaced and pouted, saying: “And you, look at yourselves, here you forget the virtue and become jealous! To belong to this community, faithful to God, it will be necessary to hold yourselves in purity and avoid sin. However, I see well that none among you can claim to such a level of virtue. Turn then toward God, my brothers, for He is merciful and the occasion remains for you to wash away your faults and to follow the way that I show you.

Thus do not be sorrowful, for you will be my successors. You will carry the good news to all the nations by helping Titus to create my Church. Thus, I call on you to be guides to those faithful to God. Be models for those who listen to you, because a bad guide traces a bad road for those who follow it. I name you as Bishops. You will have responsibility for the safety of your flocks.”

Finally, Christos judged that the crowd had heard enough for the time being and he dispersed them.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:00 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XII Répondre en citant

Chapter 12

When the crowd dissipated, the place was emptied, leaving room for the guards of the Roman procurator who controlled the city. It was then, my friends, that I experienced one of the major fears of my life; the soldiers, dressed in blood red, converged suddenly on the place, seeming to come from all directions at once.

Some emerged on the walls and others left various buildings, blocking all the exits and all the doors. A powerful orator then descended the steps from the palace of the governor, accompanied by a robust centurion.

Having arrived in the middle of the place, this powerful orator stopped his walk, and leaned over toward his centurion. This last then spoke and his large brutal voice cried to us: “You, Christos, who say you are the Messiah and the guide! I say that you do harm to this city. You are a fomenter of rebellion, a dangerous revolutionist, a man of chaos. I now demand that you follow me!”

We others, his apostles, were paralyzed by fear. We did not hear the whistle of the breeze that rustled the capes of the Romans. And we watched, anxiously, for the reaction of Christos. Daju was terrified, he who had been most upset not to be chosen by Christos to build his Church.

Christos said, then, to the centurion: “In truth, I say to you, man of little faith, I would not follow you, for it is you who will follow me!”

Then, the powerful orator ordered the centurion to seize Joshua, and the officer, with a ferocious expression, approached us with a slow step. I breathed at the rate and in the rhythm of his steps, trying to calm my heart, which beat at a panicked rate. When he was face to face with Christos, the Centurion looked him in the eyes, intensely and rather lengthily. Then, suddenly, he removed his helmet and knelt by our Messiah, clutching the hem of his robe.

“Teacher,” he begged, to the great surprise of his superior, “I would like to follow you and belong to this community of the faithful ones. What must I do? I know that I am sinning and that I have served a bad Master, but I request some word from you. Tell me how I may repent! ”

Then Christos raised him and under the spineless glance of the Romans, he pronounced these words: “Sinning, you have said, and you have just done the first thing that the faithful ones will have to do; to be humble and confess. Thus, if your repentance is sincere, God forgives you.”

Christos turned to his apostles, and continued: “And you, know that the sins made by your flocks are forgiven if they come to confess them to your ears; if they are ready to make penitence of it.”

Then Christos approached the fountain, and said to the Centurion: “By the grace of the Eternal, I will wash away your sins, renewing you of water, the source of life.”

And Christos plunged his hands joined under the jet of the fountain. He sprayed the figure of the Centurion in this water, whispering these words: “Lord, condescend to wash this man of his sin, and to thus give him a new birth among believers! I ask this in the name of The Most High. Amen.”

Then, Christos called us to him, and we, his apostles, one after another, were fortified by Christos in the water of the fountain, giving to us the second birth. He said to us: “My apostles, men and women, by the grace of God, you here have washed away your sins. Show Him that you could be worthy of this honour that He does you, because the sacrament of Baptism could be withdrawn from whoever betrays the substance of it.”

It was one of the most intense days of my life, and one which I never forgot, so much it is engraved in my memory. Our emotion was at its highest pitch when we realized that the soldiers had deserted the place.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:01 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XIII Répondre en citant

Chapter 13

And yes! This man seemed capable of many wonders. His faith was so strong that he seemed to be in constant communion with The Most High. When we sought to understand him, we questioned him, and he always answered us, endlessly: “My friends, God lives in every thing because He is the Creator, whether these are human, or bits of grass, butterflies, clouds, the breeze of the wind…”

But Christos, contrary to us, almost seemed to reach the divine perfection; he felt the divine existence with so great a store of faith that no miracle seemed to be impossible for him.

Thus, after the mysterious departure of the Roman soldiers, which, today, I realize must have quite simply left to seek reinforcements, Christos guided us toward a large, richly furnished house and a middle-class woman who there sold food, drink and lodging. He had decided that we would be established there in that place until the following day.

However, when the daughter of our hosts came with a jug of wine to serve to us as well as bread, Christos recognized her. It was Natchiachia, who had addressed him previously, at the night’s crowd of listeners.

Natchiachia poured the wine into Christos’s cup, and asked him: “Teacher, I am in pain with a deep torment of the heart. I would like to follow you in your lesson, but I love a man who lives here named Yhonny, I love him with a pure love, sparkling like diamond… What says Aristotle on this question and what must I do? ”

Christos answered her: “When two beings share a pure love and they wish to perpetuate our species by procreation, God allows them, by the sacrament of the marriage, to live their love. This so pure love, experienced in virtue, glorifies God, because He is love and the love by which humanity exists is the most beautiful homage that can be made to him. But, like baptism, marriage is a commitment for life, Natchiachia, judiciously selected, because in the faith that you and Yhonny will have married by, you will not be able to any more to withdraw from it. ”

And these last words struck those assembled with astonishment, because the time period was rife with inconstancy… Natchiachia began again: “But, Master, will we be strong enough to respect this choice and to live without sinning?”

Then, Christos answered: “Know you that humans doubt by nature, and that the love which they hold for God and their neighbors can know risk as much as anything else in life. But the virtuous life is an ideal toward which man must tend. And, on his way, he can be helped by prayer. The prayer can indeed be the means for reinforcing this love when necessary. Do not forget, either, the power of mercy, which is granted thanks to sincere repentance.”

Christos turned then to us, his apostles, whom he had named as his bishops. He said to us: “And you, my friends, as you will have to devote yourselves completely to God, as I do myself, love in the manner of which is shared personally between humans will be forever prohibited to you. You must love humanity, and not particular humans. In this, marriage is not for you, nor even sexual activity.”

And as certain apostles were disappointed by this rule, they started to grumble and murmur between themselves unpleasant words. Christos looked at them, and informed them: “These restrictions will be the price of your commitment. Learn within yourselves how to like them, because they will enable you to carry out your holy mission.”

But Daju, whose flesh was very weak, looked at Natchiachia with a lustful glance. Moreover, he was of a jealous temperament and appreciated neither the friendship that Christos carried now to the Centurion, nor the particular benevolence he showed me because of my youth. This is why he rose, irate, and exclaimed: “And why should I respect that? Why should I obey based upon a commitment that does not relate to me? You gave us the role of bishop, but guard jealously for yourself the command of the Church.”

Then Christos answered him, calmly: “Verily I say it to you; I hold the command because I am the most capable to guide you. Along the entire way that we traversed, I have been like a father, one who took care of you. But the result is tiredness and labor, not exalted status. My role is difficult and abrasive… I become exhausted because I carry the weight of the suffering of all men.

“But you, Daju, I see anger invading your face. Know that the task that I have entrusted to you and to the others is quite as noble, and will be also difficult. Moreover, to assist you in your task, you will be able to name other guides, other shepherds who will have the responsibility of each city. And you will be those that will decide my successor.”

But Daju was furious. He had been corrupted by the Creature Without Name because he could not gain some personal advantage and he left us at that time. Christos looked at his retreating figure without saying anything. His glance then fell on the Centurion, who was yet with us, and whose sword gleamed at his side. Christos turned to him and specified: “And you, Gracius, if you want to also become one of these shepherds who will guide the herd, you must set aside your sword, because weapons are sources of violence whereas you will have the mission of teaching friendship and the love of God.”

And he repeated, then, to us all: “Then, my apostles, my clerics, with you to follow the way which I have shown you, with you to baptize those who want to enter into the community of the faithful of God, with you to ordain as priests those who wish to be devoted entirely to the love of God, with you to hear the confession of those who wish to be washed of their sins, with you to punish those who could not be worthy of the love of God and to preach at least each Sunday, the will of The Most High will be achieved.”

After this episode, Christos spoke to us a long time about his Church, the way in which he wanted it, with a head and branches, a living body. And the whole resting on a solid basis; people of belief. I took note, in addition, of all his recommendations, my friends: these are those that Titus and other disciples taught and dispersed widely after having implemented them.
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