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The Life of Christos
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:02 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XIV Répondre en citant

Chapter 14

The meal occurred very merrily, as all the guests were happy to celebrate the beginnings of the new Church of Aristotle. But I noticed that the eyes of Christos contained a strange expression, full of sadness and melancholy. He was quieter than accustomed, and yet, most of his apostles did not realize it, occupied as they were with devising peace and love.

I say to you now that, as for me, the attitude of Christos could not have escaped my notice. I thus approached him and asked him: “Teacher, why are you of this mind? What is wrong?”

He whispered to me then: “Samoht, my younger friend, faithful among the faithful ones, see you not that Daju left? To undoubtedly plot against me? That poor one must be corrupted, but he accomplished his destiny so that prophecy is achieved!”

“But, finally, let this fool cry in his corner,” I answered him, “for, if the Romans wanted to take to you, they would have done it! But they all left!”

And Christos, who felt his end approaching, looked at me with an upset expression, that still causes me tremors in the throat at the hour that I write these lines.

“Samoht,” he said to me, “when I have died, travel the world and spread the good news as I have asked of you. And when you are an old man, then write my history so that it is known and heard. Retain it well, for I would not say it twice… Hold… I hear already the guards arrive.”

And indeed, the ground trembled under the weight of the sandals of legionaries. The discussion ceased then, giving way to an anxious silence. An officer and his guards entered the room. At the side of the officer was Daju, and this last pointed to Christos with his finger while saying: “It is him! It is him! Great bearded, there, the very large one! Same as a match before kindling, one could say! He has just plotted against the established order.”

Then, the guards threw themselves on Christos, tossing aside all the apostles who tried to interpose. A soldier sent me to the ground because I was holding fast to the clothing of my Messiah. Lastly, they seized him and forced him roughly out of the room. As I had risen to my feet I clutched the cape of a soldier, hoping to make him stagger, and the officer ordered also that I be seized. So we were both carried out through the streets to the palace of the Procurator, Ponce.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:02 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XV Répondre en citant

Chapter 15

You understand now, my dear children, why I can tell you what occurred then. I was indeed in that very place, right behind Christos. My eyes, my ears, indeed, all my senses were in great alertness as in moments of great distress.

Having arrived in the office of the Procurator, he looked at us and questioned us: “Which of you is it that is made to be called Christos?”

We both answered, without hesitation: “It is I, Roman!”

Yes, my dear children, I loved Christos so much that I wished to undergo his punishment in his place and this is why I tried to attract suspicion on myself… but I was not equal to the greatness of my claim: Ponce was not deceived, for he had opposite him a large and beautiful man and a sad young rebel. It is thus natural that he addressed himself to Christos in these terms: “So, you are he that is called the Messiah, the guide, the mirror of the divinity? And you disturb the order of the city?”

“You have said it, buffoon!” Christos answered.

“Listen,” said Ponce, “since you have arrived in Jerusalem, the city began going badly. The bread is stale, the vegetables withered, the fish smelly, and the meat nauseating. All this because, now, people want to do nothing but listen to you. Moreover, you weaken the power of Rome and our pagan worship by saying all these stupid, ridiculous things about love, and all these things that people should not believe! Now, I have just received a complaint from the head of the pagan priests; it appears that you treated yourself to his flask! This is a pretty problem!”

The figure of Christos smiled before answering: “Yes, I know it. Your Empire looks like a paddle wheel. Each mechanism is in the place that is appropriate to him by his birth, and regularly achieves the task for which he was created. And you benefit from that by controlling the people, and forcing them to work for indecent wages. However, here I am, one who brings the truth; it is not surprising that I should inconvenience you… I know it very well. Moreover: The first which says the truth, he will be assassinated!”

Ponce says then: “What, you do not approve of slavery? Even as it is exerted on other tribes that hold it also?”

“No,” affirmed Christos, “solidarity must now exceed the simple framework of the city! We all are human and in that we are the creatures of God. For this reason to make a vagrant to work in the mine for less than 17 coins is a shame, even if it comes from another City. And to make it sweat for less than 18 coins, by making it kill calf, cow or pig, is a scandal!”

Ponce was aggravated… He declared then: “Christos, you will be banished. Now you are released. Following business: Kramer versus Kramer. Ah, and do not forget to release Bar-Tabac, it is the day of amnesty today. ”

Then, Christos was astonished by the sentence, and pronounced these words: “Procurator! You can banish me, but in whatever city that I will be in, I will act always thus, and will become the same danger to the plenitude of the Empires and the Republics which constitute the world.”

Ponce was exceedingly angry and answered him: “Since you think yourself so wise, and since I have now heartburn, you will be crucified like the agitators, and in addition, since you have wasted my time and disturbed my digestion, you will be tortured. It was not necessary to seek me!”

Then the Procurator noticed my presence, and he had pity on me in my youth, seeing me in tears. He turned to one of his guards and said to him: “I do not care about this one, just take him outside!”

But Christos caught me by the sleeve and had time to whisper in my ear: “My body will undergo a thousand torments, but it is so that your heart does not have to undergo them. When you pray to The Most High, devote the bread and the wine to friendship, symbols of my flesh and my blood, in order to never forget my sacrifice for you. Also pay homage to those who, by their virtue, will be an example in your eyes of the love that is due to God. In truth, there is no more beautiful homage to God than to love without anything to gain in return.”

These last words were shouted because some guards carried Christos into the jail while others seized me to throw me outside.
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Former Cardinal Chamberlain of England, Scotland, and Ireland
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:03 am    Sujet du message: Chapter XVI Répondre en citant

Chapter 16

It was one atrocious moment! When I fell on the street, the guards kicked me and beat me, but I was so upset by what I had just witnessed that I did not feel the hardness of the paving stones nor the soles of their shoes. The confidence of Christos gave me enlightenment, and I seized finally all the vastness of the History of this man.

I rose, crying, and stumbled down the streets, not knowing any more where to go… The idlers observed me curiously, some pityingly, others amused. Then, suddenly, I heard the sonority of a Roman trumpet… Instinctively, I guided myself to the source of the noise and my steps carried me out onto a great place.

The troop of legionaries was assembled around Christos, with Ponce and the chief pagan at the head, horsed. All went up, in a slow train, toward the hill of the condemned… An increasingly large crowd, whose clamour filled up the lanes and went up toward the sky, followed them. Nothing could stop the convoy, though, not even the cries of Natchiachia and the apostles…

With Christos, they took along two others, also condemned to public execution; these were named Black and Decker. These criminals were to be quartered.

The climb was painful and exhausting, especially on this hot and heavy day. The sun illuminated nature and the city, covering it with a layer of brightness and tension. But that did not prevent the crowd from assembling and from crying over the death of one whom it had just started to love.

Ponce and the large pagan priest, who were not tired, because they were horsed, soon reached the top of the hill. Seeing the crowd piling up, they decided that Christos’ punishment, to have disturbed the order of the city and to have preached against the belief of the impious priests, was to be exemplary.

Christos was whipped for more than an hour by the guards, but not a cry ever escaped from his mouth. He endured their worst lashes with a calm and serene air.

Then, the torturers scoffed at his faith and insulted God, hoping to unchain his anger. But he never answered them, even when they girded him with cords that they tightened with pulleys according to the wishes of the large priest.

Christos remained still as though of marble in front of the cruelty of these men, alone in his suffering and his sorrow, but supported by faith in God. His face was never as beautiful as at this time. His anguish had passed and there remained on his features only the expressions of a deep love and a great inner peace.

The Romans and the pagans thus decided to pass on to more serious punishments. They ordered then for the crucifixion to take place.

They nailed Christos on a large wood cross that they then hoisted up on the hill. And Christos was found there above all, dominating the other human ones… Such as a lamb, he had been sacrificed on the altar of the established order because he called into question the society of the time and its false values.

Christos died after hours of anguish… anguish during which he prayed to The Most High and looked down on the men below. It was the evening, when the air chilled and the sky darkened, that he gave up his soul with a sigh.

Then, from the sky, a large ray of light pierced the dark and threatening clouds and haloed the body of Christos. Without causing this halation to disappear from sight, the skies were reflected to thunder, and, suddenly, from the sky, terrifying flashes of lightning came to strike the ground as though punishing it for having let this atrocious crime be perpetrated… In an appalling outburst of the violence of the elements, a beating rain was made in its turn to fall, driving the Romans from the hill of the condemned and soaking the ground, washing it clean of the blood of Christos; this blood which one saw soon streaming down the hillock, mingled with the blood, the sweat and the tears of the other condemned as well.

But after a moment, nature calmed down, the rain ceased, the flashes stopped, the rumbling thunder fell silent and the clouds moved off, overcome by the growing ray of light that now flooded the hill.

At this point in time we saw appearing, in this beneficent halation, a cloud of celestial angels. All came down from the sky with great grace, flying with the utmost distinction. They took the body of the Messiah, guide and mirror of the divinity, and hoisted it to the skies, taking it along to join the throne of God.
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Former Cardinal Chamberlain of England, Scotland, and Ireland
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:04 am    Sujet du message: Epilogue Répondre en citant

Epilogue


Here, my friends, my children, my brothers, I have delivered to you my memories of the life of this great and astonishing man. I say to you that, in beginning the drafting of these memories, I was afraid that death would not enable me to lead them to their conclusion. Today, I am reassured, and perhaps, also, if God lends me life, I could teach you still more from the things of Christos, and on what became of his apostles.

Remember especially his message… live as he lived because he is an example to be followed. He himself said it to me several times: “That all the men and the women follow the way which I showed, and God will reward the righteous ones when He gives His judgment.”

I would have such an amount of things to say, of stories to tell, on Christos, on his words, his proverbs, his allegories. I would transcribe them one day, if I find time and the strength for it… but, alas, life passes like a shooting star, and time so quickly leads us to old age that we do not realize it at all.

Thus, I will say that I have occupied my existence to transmit the good news to all the cities, all the republics, all the Empires. I traveled, I studied, I met, I prayed, and I attempted, as much as possible, to fill my days with love and friendship, virtue, and forgiveness. That has been the key to my happiness.

Do I deserve Paradise? I do not know, because only The Most High can decide that. In all events, my terrestrial life was beautiful and marvelous and I thank each day the Eternal for having given me a soul.

These, my writings, are for you a will, my friends! This is what you will inherit from me and which I give to you as a good-bye. Take them in care and share with the others, reveal it, spread it everywhere where you will be able.

Ah! I do not wish to finish and to leave you there, because I cannot be resolved to tear myself from this soft, mystical environment which hugs me close each time I remind myself of my youth… but now my eyes are tired, the wavering gleam of my candle is not enough anymore to light my parchment… my quill falls often from my pained fingers…

And the night invades my cell, leaving me alone, pensive, bathed in the soft clear light of the moon.

Samoht, 87 after Christos.
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MessagePosté le: Ven Avr 11, 2008 4:05 am    Sujet du message: 21 Logion of Christos Répondre en citant

21 Logia of Christos

Here are deposited the sentences of Christos the Sage, taught by Samoht and transmitted to us for generation upon generation.

Logion 1: “Nobility is of the soul, and it is within your heart that you must be noble. But know that, even thus, you will be vulnerable, because nobility is often wounded by baseness.”

Logion 2: The disciples said to Christos: “Teacher, these misfits do not bring anything to us, and Aristotle warns us against those who shun the city!”
Christos answered them: “Disciples! Live for others instead of waiting for others to live for you. It is for the city to accommodate the misfits, and not for the misfits to help the city.”

Logion 3: The disciples asked Christos: “Teacher, after The Most High chose Aristotle to teach us, why is necessary that now He chooses to you to perform in the same way? Wasn't the message of Aristotle complete?”
Then Christos answered: “My friends, the soul is made up of two parts: comprehension and knowledge. Aristotle came to bring comprehension to you, and I came to bring knowledge. Between Aristotle and me lies all the difference which exists between convincing and persuading.”

Logion 4: Sometimes, in the face of the metaphysical arguments which the disciples read in Aristotle, it happened that they were discouraged. They asked then: “Teacher, what is, to you, the essential purpose of reason? ” And Christos answered: “Faith brings us to the truth. But to understand it, it is necessary for us to use reason.”

Logion 5: And Christos said: “Reason and mysticism both allow us to understand God, each one of them combining in each one of us. You find your path toward The Most High in the inspiration provided to you by the reason of Aristotle and by my religion.”

Logion 6: But Christos warned us: “Reason without the agreement of the heart is like an empty shell. The essence is lost, and God is greater than the bickering of these parties.”

Logion 7: Christos said: “The love which we bear for our parents resembles neither that which we dedicate to our spouses nor the friendship which we offer to our friends. This love is found always and without doubt between the two, from one to the other. Thus God should be loved.”

Logion 8: Sometimes, the disciples gorged themselves on the food which their hosts served to them. Then they lounged on the comfortable beds that were offered to them. However, the following day, they rendered service to these same hosts while working for them. But Christos asked: “We eat to live, we sleep to live, we work to live… but for what purpose do we live?”

Logion 9: Sometimes Christos advised us: “If life has no meaning for you, then love life itself more than the meaning of life. Do not wait for death to understand that you pass your life alongside life itself. Recall: We were not only born to die, we were born to live.”

Logion 10: And with regard to the attitude to be had concerning every day life, Christos stated: “Do not await anything more from life. Be not like the listless, but as those which know that at every moment, all is infinitely given to them.”

Logion 11: And when someone asked Christos how one could find happiness, the prophet answered: “Happiness lies in the simple things, and not in the complicated reasoning which makes people unhappy. How to be happy when one questions the mystery of God with facts so complex that we can understand them only when we ourselves come to Him in the Sun?”

Logion 12: “The sunlight will then dissipate our fears, our doubts, our worries, our questions, our hatreds and our sorrows. Its heat will remove from us all discomfort and cold.”

Logion 13: On love, Christos would sometimes say: “Love is the child of the unconventional persons, who never, ever know the law.” One day, one of his disciples, in love with a beautiful peasant woman, was rejected by her… then Christos indicated: “Love is the child of salvation, which never, ever knows the law.”

Logion 14: To miscreants come to contradict him, Christos answered: “Believe in God, for outside of God and religion, no speck of truth exists, nothing of value, nothing of meaning; nothing exists outside of God. In return, existence is free, therefore, believe in Him and cease using the broken option.”

Logion 15: To men who fought, Christos said: “But you will love you one another, in the name of God!”

Logion 16: When he spoke about life, Christos was excited: “Density from densities, all is only density,” or: “A man is worth more than all that he did, whether good or bad,” or: “Life is worth anything, anything; but, me, when I hold in my dazzled hands the two small hands of my friend, then I say nothing, nothing is worth a life!”

Logion 17: When the Nameless Creature and its partisans use force, whoever ceases to fight is complicit with them. When Good faces Evil, all inhabitants of the City must raise as one to destroy that Evil.

Logion 18: To those to whom The Most High seemed inaccessible, even after the arguments of Aristotle, Christos said: “To approach God and the comprehension of the universe, art is for you a surer means than reason or philosophy. Imagine a body in decomposition, the intestines decaying, the eyes gobbled by carrion, the flesh peeling away in scraps… and say you that this body has been able to love, to think, to feel, to make love, to cry… but also to compose music, to paint frescos, to write poems... as much as work of which one may profit nowadays.”

Logion 19: Christos said: “If you wonder; Who am I? From where do I come? Where do I go? Then you can even answer yourselves: I am me, I come from my home, and I go back there.”

Logion 20: And often, upright like a matchstick, Christos confided in us: “In the heart of the repressed lies sometimes our coherence.”

Logion 21: “Be wary of errant beliefs, my friends… for the heretics are like ants; they always return.”

Translated by Saint Trufaldini
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