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The Canon Law (old version)

 
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MessagePosté le: Sam Fév 10, 2007 5:33 am    Sujet du message: The Canon Law (old version) Répondre en citant

Canon law - Book 1 -: The secular Church. (July 1454)

Canon law - Book 2 -: The regular Church. (July 1454)

Canon law - Book 3 -: The government of the Church. (July 1455)

Canon law - Book 4 -: Justice of the Church. (October 1454)


Approved and adopted by the Curia in the months here above mentioned, now offered to the discernment of the English faithful via the auspices of the Order of St. Jerome, February 1455.

Further revisions will be appended herein as necessary.


Dernière édition par wheeler le Sam Fév 10, 2007 6:18 am; édité 1 fois
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MessagePosté le: Sam Fév 10, 2007 5:36 am    Sujet du message: Book 1 - The Secular Church Répondre en citant

Regulations of the Aristotelian Church

Preamble:

The Holy Church of God was instituted by the common agreement of the heirs to Aristotle and the disciples of Christ. These wise men, conscious of human weakness, desired that the lessons of the elected officials of God be transmitted by men who would keep intact the store of wisdom and revelation.

To this end, the Church, in order to achieve its divine mission as well as possible, decided to institute clear and precise rules, thus allowing the effective development of its salvation activity. Thus a distortion within this charter could even put the Church in danger, in its operation and in its sanctity. This is why we curse those who, in their folly and pride, would have the audacity to contravene it and to scorn the divine laws of the Holy Aristotelian Church.


The Aristotelian people


1 The Aristotelian Dogma


Art 1: The Aristotelian Church is the universal spiritual institution which has as its aim to help all the children of God to escape the lunar Hell and to reach the solar Paradise.

Art 2: The Aristotelian Church is the only holder of divine truth and any person not being faithful to its tenets is being heretical and thus dedicating itself to eternal damnation.

Art 3: Heterodoxies are those false beliefs which contradict Aristotelian dogma and induce error or misunderstanding in the children of God.

Art 4: The heterodoxies are of four types: schism, heresy, paganism and atheism.

Art 5: Heterodoxy may be tolerated only according to the goodwill of the Curia, within the framework of a legal settlement which will fix the freedoms granted by this tolerance.

Art 6: The Aristotelian Church takes its name from the prophet Aristotle, who was the first to reveal the divine truth.

Art 7: The Aristotelian Church was established by the Messiah, Christos, the second and last prophet, who completed the first, Aristotelian, revelation.

Art 8: There are no other prophets than Aristotle and Christos, and their cumulated revelations gave to us the true divine message, perfect and immutable.

Art 9: Although exceeding the other children of God in glory and virtue, Aristotle and Christos are of human nature, not divine.

Art 10: The entirety of the Aristotelian dogma is in the Book of Virtues.

Art 11: The texts which the Book of Virtues contains are sacred and the truth of the least of their elements cannot be called into question, under penalty of heterodoxy.

Art 12: The saints being perished Aristotelians whose lives were exemplary, all Aristotelians must honor them and take their examples as a starting point for themselves in their own spiritual lives.

Art 13: For a person to be declared sainted, it is necessary that she died, that she lived as a paragon of virtue, that her hagiography was written, and that she be validated by the Curia and by the faithful.

Art 14: A hagiography being a holy text, criticism or questioning of these is an act of heterodoxy.

Art 15: All humans being children of God, no segregation based on criteria other than faith, virtue and merit should ever take place within the Aristotelian Church.

2. Classification Status.

Art 1: Any human being, whatever else he is, can be classified as one of the following: hétérodox, believing, faithful or priest.

Art 2: A person can receive only the sacraments authorized by his status.

Art 3: A heterodox is outside the community of believers, either because he has been excommunicated or because he does not share the Aristotelian faith or because he is in opposition to the canon law of the Aristotelian Church.

Art 4: A heterodox can receive only the sacrament of confession.

Art 5: The believer is one which is not excommunicated, which shares the Aristotélian faith and which respects the canon law of the Aristotélian Church.

Art 6: The believer can receive the sacraments of confession and baptism.

Art 7: The faithful one is a believer which received the sacrament of baptism.

Art 8: The faithful one can receive the sacraments of confession, marriage, ordination and the funeral.

Art 9: It is necessary to have the status of faithful to receive the sacrament of marriage or ordination.

Art 10: Excommunication is the canonical penalty which withdraws the sacrament of baptism from the faithful one, which gives him the statute of hétérodox.

Art 11: The Faithful which has been excommunicated loses not only the status of faithful, but also that of priest. He loses also the effect of the sacrament of the marriage, and any title of honour given by the Church.

Art 12: The faithful one is married having received the sacrament of the marriage.

Art 13: The married can receive the sacraments of confession and the funeral.

Art 14: The priest is a faithful one having received the sacrament of ordination.

Art 15: The priest can receive the sacraments of confession and the funeral.

The Hierarchy of the Church.


This hierarchy through which the divine action is carried out divides into several degrees:

3: The Pope is at the top of the Church, as the intermediary between God and men. It has complete power in the Church and its decisions cannot be appealed. It exerts power using the Curia, which is its council and its government. It is elected by the Curia by 2/3 majority.

4: The Curia, government of the Church, is composed of the cardinals chosen by the Pope (after having taken council of the Curia) according to their merits. These cardinals are selected among the bishops of the Aristotelian Dioceses.

5: As far as possible each country will be represented in the Curia by at least one cardinal.

6: Mode of election of the cardinals:

§1: If the pope selects a cardinal personally then this appointment is made without further procedure.

§2: If the Curia chooses a new cardinal, a vote will be organized within its council, to designate the bishop who is best able to serve the Church at this elevated level.

§3: The chosen bishop can always refuse this honor. In this case the Curia will have to proceed to a new vote to choose another cardinal.

§4: No one may claim the honor of a Cardinalcy, consequently no request or offer will be instituted for this election.

7: Bishops.

§1: After the high pontiff and the cardinals, the third rank in the Church is that of the bishopric.

§2: The bishop is a priest chosen by the Pope and the Curia to direct a diocese. He is the spiritual father of the faithful of this diocese and has the moral responsibility for their spiritual good.

§3: A bishop is either a metropolitan archbishop, or suffragan archbishop, or suffragan bishop or bishop “in partibus” according to the status of the diocese on which it is dependent. These distinctions are not distinctions of substance but of dignity and honor.

§4: Each bishop is free to control his diocese as he sees fit, provided it complies with the regulations of the Church. This autonomy of government does not exempt it from the need to work in common with the other bishops and his metropolitan archbishop within the framework of its ecclesiastical province.

§5 Each bishop is connected to the episcopal assemblies of the kingdoms where they exert an authority in time that Bishop.
The bishops in partibus will be able to join the assembly of the kingdom of their main home.

Citation:
Additional rules concerning the Bishops and Cardinals.

A Cardinal in function will be able to sit as a Bishop in the Episcopal assembly of the territory which is his main home even if he has no more responsibility as a Bishop in the territory of that assembly.

The Bishops and/or Cardinals who resign their positions from now on may be recognized respectively as Bishop Emeritus and Cardinal Emeritus.

Bishop Emeritus: for a period of two months, in so far as they were correct and faithful in their responsibilities and behavior for more than three months.
Cardinal Emeritus: for a period of six months, in so far as they were correct and faithful in their responsibilities and behavior for more than six months.

The Emeritus Bishops and Cardinals will be able to sit in the Episcopal assembly responsible for the territory where they have their main homes, but only by agreement of that assembly.

The attribution of the title of Cardinal Emeritus is not automatic and must be granted by the Curia.


8: Priests and the Diocesan Council.

§1: Each village has a church, which must be held and managed by a priest. The priest is named by the bishop. He can manage his parish as he desires it, in the respect of the laws of his diocese and the Church.

§2: The priests can name deacons, who assist them in their duties. The deacons can be priests or laity. The deacons, unlike the priests, may be affiliated with several parishes.

Citation:
What is the deaconate?

A deacon is an assistant (subordinate) of a priest. He can help him to perform the church services (the sacraments.) He is also useful as a substitute, and can thus celebrate all alone. He has the capacity to issue certificates of baptism (via the registers). A deacon may be a layman. If laic, he can thus carry weapons and be married.

The status of a deacon is not final; if one realizes that one is not made for this way, he can always retire.

[NRP: Succinctly, being a deacon is also a manner of familiarizing oneself with the RP role of a priest while waiting to gain level 3 (necessary for ordination IG). A deacon does not have access to the priest's interface and can thus only celebrate RP ceremonies. I point out that, for the moment, the members of the way of the Church are not paid for what they do and that this path requires much time IRL compared to other ways.]

How to become deacon?
To become a deacon, it is necessary to make a request to your local priest or to your bishop. If this one does not answer or if there is no priest present, you can make your request to the nearest priest. As a last resort, you can make your request to Rome.
There are at least three conditions to become deacon: to be baptized, to be registered with the registers and not to belong to any criminal or heretical organization. In order to know the dogma well, it is also necessary to read the Book of the Virtues. It is also available under another version in your cathedral [NRP: Not yet available in England]. Belonging to an order is also certainly an advantage. Lastly, you can also register with the seminar which will provide you with templates for preaching, sermons, etc.


§3: The bishops are assisted in their duties by a diocesan council. The members of the council are named canons. Just like the deacons, the canons can be priests or laity.
Each bishop regulates in his own way the working procedure of the council diocesan, however the bishop is supposed to regularly consult it on important questions.

§4: The advisers diocesans are: The person in charge of the treasury, the person in charge of the doctrine, the person in charge of the relations with the priests, the “dachshund with close-cropped hair,” the consultant in religion and the overseer of the dioceses.

§5: The suffragan dioceses do not have a consultant in religion or overseer for the dioceses.


Dernière édition par wheeler le Sam Fév 10, 2007 6:10 pm; édité 1 fois
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MessagePosté le: Sam Fév 10, 2007 5:39 am    Sujet du message: Book 2 - The Regular Church Répondre en citant

The regular Church

It is necessary to distinguish two Churches through the foundation from Christ and first Aristotelians: The secular Church, made up of priests who live with the world (i.e. in relation to the laic ones) and the regular Church made up of monks (who can also be priests) who live in monastic communities and are governed by monastic rules.

The Statute of the monks:

Art 1: What is a monk?

§1: A monk is a person engaged in a monastery (coded).
He can thus be level 1, 2 or 3. He is not to be regarded any more as laic, whether of Church way or not.

§2 To be a monk it is necessary to be accepted by an abbot in a monastery (coded) and to live under the authority of the rules validated by the abbot, Rome or a diocese, who will direct his behavior in every day life.

§3: Once in the monastery the statute of monk applies; the abbot will check that the monks respect strictly the duties imposed by the Church, and also the rule of the monastery.

§4 Unlike the priest which chooses this way for life, the choice to be a monk is not final.

§5 In the event of disrespect of the duties of the monk, or the rule of the monastery, the abbot can cause a monk to leave the monastery and thus withdraw the statute of monk from him.

§6 the monk must comply with these rules to belong to the Church Aristotelian RP:

Citation:

The monk cannot be member of any heretical organization.
The monk recognizes and applies the Aristotelian dogma.
The monk recognizes and respects the Aristotelian canon law.
The marriage of a monk is impossible; it reserves its love exclusive for God.
The monk can, unlike the priest, carry weapons; the rule of a monastery can thus include military activity.
The respect of the hierarchy must be assumed by all the monks. The superior of a monk is the abbot.
- As for the elementary rules of RK. Any proven in court to be a clone will not be accepted as a monk.
The monastery is completely independent of the laic lords; no interference can take place. They are dependent only by possible legal settlement or of the approved contracts of trade.

The three official places where the monks can organize and carry out ceremonies are:
1) Rome
2) The official forum
3) The forum of the monastery

The monk who is a priest (Level 3 of the Church way) has the same duties as the priests (in addition to those listed.)


Orders [RP]

The orders gather in the community of the Aristotelians of all horizons; one finds the laic ones there, priests or monks who propagate their values and the values of the Church through the kingdoms.

Art 2: Definition

§1: The goal of the orders is RP, it must absolutely promote and defend the faith and the Aristotelian Church.

§2: Orders RP attached in Rome must absolutely line up in these conditions:

Citation:

- All the members must be Aristotelian, they thus have same the duty, rights and behaviors to be raised.
Those responsible for the order must be pious Aristotelians.
Its base of monastic rule must be based on the Aristotelian religion and must be in agreement with the dogma and the canon law.
- The order must distinguish clearly between the laity, the monks and the priests. Statutes must portion beings set up within the order.
- The order should not be a criminal organization, recognized as such by laic justice.
- The integration of a member (laic, monk or priest) into two different religious orders is impossible.
On the other hand, a member of a religious order can be member of a military order (while knowing that the priest cannot use weapons.)



§3: Relations between orders [RP] and the secular Church:

Citation:

All the structures of the orders attached to the Vatican, namely, each commandery, each monastery, each abbey, each convent are under the authority of the metropolitan archbishop of the archdiocese, relay of the curia and the Pope.

The capacities of archbishop are limited to:
- To accept or not the installation of an order and the foundation of a structure in their jurisdiction.
- To exert a control on the orders installed in its province. In the event of disrespect of the orders of the curia, canon law or dogma, it can call the inquisition.

The military actions of the military orders required by the Pope and the curia depend only on those and not on the bishop, even if that one by co-operation and confidence can be used as relay.



§4: Special rules apply to the military orders:

Citation:

1) At the time of a mission indicated by the Pope (by the curia, therefore, after a unanimous vote), they are subjected to the authority of the Pope and the curia, and must be held to it.

In this case, the order must affirm and show the primacy of its loyalty to the Pope, and not to the sovereign of its kingdom. Only one oath is authorized, that towards the Pope.

2) Apart from the pontifical and episcopal missions, they remain completely independent.

3) Being a military and religious Order, they must very clearly distinguish the temporal ones from the spiritual ones.

The priests of the religious wing will not be able to take part in the field of the war, they will have to remain only in their spiritual obligations.
Only the laic ones and the monks will be able to carry the weapons.
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MessagePosté le: Sam Fév 10, 2007 5:42 am    Sujet du message: Book 3 - Church Government Répondre en citant

Citation:

Canon Law - Book 3 - The Government of the Church
Updated July 5 1455

Introduction

Art 1: Rome is the place of Government of the Church. It is composed of various institutions: Roman Congregations. The Pope and the Curia sit there.

Art 2: Rome is the seat of the Government of the Universal Church. In the exercise of his supreme, plenary and proximate power over the Universal Church, the Roman Pontiff himself uses the subdivisions of the Roman Curia; it is thus on its behalf and by its authority that those fill their duties for the good of the Church and the service of the faithful.

The subdivisions are made up of the 5 Congregations, the Episcopal Assemblies, and the Pontifical Consistories. They meet in Rome, where they are given the means to complete their missions.

The Congregation of the Holy Office
The Congregation for the Diffusion of the Faith
The Congregation of the Matters of the World
The Congregation of the Holy Inquiry
The Congregation of the Holy Armies

The Episcopal Assemblies are defined by the political grouping of the Dioceses. It is the Roman Curia which grants or withholds the right of assembly to a particular group of Dioceses. One finds there the Bishops and other Prelates of the region, under the direction of a Primate.

The Pontifical Consistories are defined by linguistic grouping and directed by a triumvirate of 3 Prelates carrying the title of Cardinal. It is the Roman Curia which grants or withholds the right to creation of a Pontifical Consistory.
- The "Roman" Cardinal (also sits at the Roman Curia and must be bilingual in French and the language of the Consistory)
- The "Chamberlain" Cardinal
- The "Primate" Cardinal (in Consistories, there is no Bishop Primate)

The mission of the Consistories is to maintain the dogmatic unity of the faith and to manage the linguistic and cultural specificities of the faithful under their jurisdiction.

§1 The Curia

Art 1.1: The Roman Curia is the top of the government of the Church.

Art 1.2: The decisions of the curia are made collectively and its operation is codified by regulation. The Pope can sever the debate at any point. In the event of absence of the Pope, the Camerlingue cardinal replaces him.

Art 1.3: The Roman Curia is basically made up of 11 Cardinals. This number can vary according to need while taking care to maintain a minimum number of 2 + 1 per Congregation + 1 per Consistory.

Art 1.4: The Curia is chaired by the Pope, and in the absence of this last, by the Camerlingue Cardinal.

Art 1.5: The Camerlingue is elected by the Curia, selected from two candidates designated by the whole of the Bishops of the Church. He must have been a Roman cardinal in function for 6 months before the election.

Art 1.6: The Curia chooses from the Bishops those which it names to this responsibility. Likewise, it alone has the power to exclude a Cardinal.

Art 1.7: The Curia comes to a conclusion about all the important points regarding the government of the Church. It receives the reports of the Congregations and determines the main trends of the life of the Church.

It is the guarantor of the two pillars of the Church: the dogma and canon law.
It is, therefore, arbiter of the decisions and recommendations made by the ministries and is possessed, in fact, of a right of interference into any of the affairs of the Church.
It must have power to control the institutions linked to Rome and has a right of veto over any decision taken on its behalf.
Any decision outside the internal framework of the ministries must, therefore, be submitted to it for validation under penalty of illegality.

It deals directly with the religious affairs of the Kingdoms on those things which demand a view of the big picture. The temporal affairs will be organized and managed locally through the subdivision, but with the primary control of the concerned Episcopal Assemblies.
At all times, the Curia, due to its role, retains a right of interference and can serve as arbiter on any subject when it considers it to be necessary.

§2 Permanent Consistories

The permanent Consistories are defined by linguistic grouping and directed by a triumvirate composed of 3 Prelates carrying the title of Cardinal. It is the Roman Curia which grants or withholds the right to creation of a Pontifical Consistory.
- One "Roman" Cardinal, who also sits at the Roman Curia and must be bilingual in French.
- Two Suffragant Cardinals, who have advisory access to the Roman Curia.

The mission of the Consistories is to maintain the dogmatic unity of the faith and to manage the linguistic and cultural specificities of the faithful under their jurisdiction. Each permanent Consistory is organized by a Concordat with the Roman Curia and their capacities can thus vary.

§3 Episcopal Assemblies

The Episcopal Assemblies are defined by political grouping of Dioceses. It is the Roman Curia which grants or withholds the right of assembly to a particular group of Dioceses. One finds there the Bishops and other Prelates of the region, under the direction of a Primate.
Each Episcopal Assembly is organized by an internal regulation validated by the Curia and their capacities can thus vary. The Assemblies cannot stray from the Roman Canon Law without explicit agreement of the Curia.

§4 Pontifical Congregations

It is the Roman Curia which determines the number of the Congregations, as well as their names and missions. One finds there the faithful, Cleric or not, Priest or laic, which commit themselves there to serve the Roman Aristotelian Church.
Each Pontifical Congregation is organized by internal regulation, validated by the Curia, and their capacities can thus vary.
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MessagePosté le: Sam Fév 10, 2007 5:44 am    Sujet du message: Book 4 - Church Justice Répondre en citant

Justice of the Church


Art 1. Faults

1. The justice of the Church is qualified in the case: of heresy, of schism, apostasy, insult or slandering towards the church, its institutions, its members or its teachings.

2. Church justice deals with all the violations of the provisions of the canon law, in particular the acts of insubordination of the clerks against their hierarchy.

3. Heresy consists of the rejection of whole or part of the dogma Aristotelian.

4. Schism consists of an attack on the unity of the Aristotelian Church by several members of the clergy.

5. Apostasy consists of one or more acts of disavowal, by a baptized Aristotelian, of its Aristotelian faith.


Art 2. Punishment

1. In all instances, the object of a lawsuit brought before the justice of Church is to obtaining of the repentance or the abjuration of the condemned.

2. The punishment must be proportional to the offense, and taking in to account of the possibility of sincere repentance.

3. The punishments are pronounced only against those that have not repented and abjured or one that relapses into the same sin or did not sincerely repent and abjure, that is to say falsely repented or abjure. The punishment for those that are prominent or noble: public apology, pilgrimage, maintenance of the poor, the carrying of the cross, public flagellation, the temporary or permanent banishment from the diocese where the offense was made, the forfeiture of the duties and privileges of Church, excommunication or anathema, the broad wall, the narrow wall, or closed and solitary confinement.

4. One that is obstinate and relapsed can be delivered to the secular arm with or without recommendation.

5. Any temporal authority refusing to discharge the saintly duty to lend assistance to the justice of the Church in its combat for the triumph of the faith could be declared an accessory to the condemned, and could be the subject of a charge in front the pontifical court, in the capacity of a public figure.

6. One condemned that would not carry out the proper punishment that was inflicted to him is legally considered as being obstinate.

7. The Cardinal Primate or the Vidame of the ecclesiastical province on the territory of which was marked the sentence (if nominated) has responsibility to supervise its proper implementation.

8. Excommunication: Excommunication is the most severe punishment against an Aristotelian; he looses all his rights as an Aristotelian including all offices held within the church and all sacramental states such as baptised, married, or ordained. In England, only the Pope, the Curia or the ESPC, (depending on whom originally declared the excommunication) can lift the state excommunication.

8-bis Clergy and the Excommunicated:
Since there can be no fellowship between light and dark, no member of the clergy should have any relationship with the excommunicated, unless the excommunicated asks for redemption. This includes that no clergy member should appear on a political list of candidates with an excommunicated member. Furthermore, clergy members should in general shun the excommunicted in public settings so that they may be taught the need to repent.

If an excommunicated member seeks redeption, the clergy member may council with him and lead him back into the Aristolean friendship. The clergy member will be allowed to speak with him until such time as the Curia or the ESPC decides to lift or not lift the sanctions against the excommunicated.

9. Capital punishment: the Church does not punish any human with execution. As was stated above in the 4th section, the obstinate and relapsed could be given to the secular authority. In some extreme cases, the ecclesiastic court could advise the temporal authorities to definitively keep the guilty from ever again plaguing the Aristotelian Community...

Ordinary justice

Art 3. Episcopal officialities.

1. Officialities are episcopal courts charged to enforce, within the dioceses, the observance of the principles of the true faith and ecclesiastical discipline. Each diocese, whether it is suffragan or metropolitan, can have its officiality. If a suffragan diocese does not have any, then it concerns the officiality of its metropolitan.

2. Officialities are qualified only for the offenses made in their diocese.

3. The selected punishment retains all its power when the condemned leaves the diocese in which it was condemned. The bishop of the diocese where the condemned might take refuge is obliged to make application of the punishment instead of the officiality which pronounced the sentence.

4. The seisin of the officiality is ensured by an ecclesiastical prosecutor, whether a complaint was deposited or not.

5. The ecclesiastical prosecutor is necessarily a member of the Aristotelian clergy having followed a training specific to the seminar of the Congregation of the Holy Inquisition, or to the seminar of a religious order having received the approval of the Congregation of the Holy Inquisition to manage the teaching of the canon law. The ecclesiastical prosecutor is named for life by the bishop of the diocese on which the officiality depends. He can be revoked only on special decision of a cardinal inquisitor.

6. The ecclesiastical prosecutor has responsibility for the direction of the lawsuit, which it conducts in secrecy. He joins together the evidence, questions the parties and the witnesses, and collects the consents. He judges appropriateness of the continuations, writes and causes to be read the bill of indictment. It is not authorized to make use of the interrogation.

7. The defendant has the right to be represented by an advocate of Aristotelian confession, ecclesiastic or not, as of the phase of the instruction and throughout the procedure thereafter.

8. The entirety of the file of instruction must be communicated to the defense if and when it makes the request of it.

9. The lawsuit is chaired by the bishop, assisted by an official, and the vidame of the ecclesiastical province on which it depends. The official is appointed for life by the bishop, among the members of the clergy of the diocese for which it has responsibility. In the absence of the vidame, it will be provided for the nomination with a second official, under the same conditions as the first.

10. The court hears, in public, the pleadings of the ecclesiastical prosecutor, and defense.

11. The judgment is given and the punishment pronounced after deliberation by the bishop, who will take care to hear beforehand the opinion of his assistants.

12. If it is considered to be guilty, the defendant can appeal the decision to the pontifical court of the inquisition. In this case, the ecclesiastical prosecutor transmits the entirety of the parts and the file to the pontifical court.

13. The ecclesiastical prosecutor can, at his discretion, appeal the decision of the officiality in front of the pontifical court.


Art 4. Pontifical court.

1. The pontifical court is chaired by the Pope, or, in his absence, in England and Scotland, by the cardinal Chamberlain, assisted by two cardinals of the English Speaking Pontifical Council. A cardinal bishop or archbishop having sat, in the first resort, to the lawsuit which is the subject of the procedure of appeal cannot belong to the pontifical court for this same cause. In such a case a cardinal from the curia should replace him in the court.

2. The pontifical court meets:
- in last resort of the calls of the decisions of episcopal officialities
- in the first resort of the causes implicating public figures, on seisin of a cardinal exclusively
- in the first resort of the causes implicating, as defendants, one or more cardinals, on seisin of Sovereign pontiff or of one their peers exclusively

3. In the event of carelessness of an episcopal officiality, the court can consider a person deprived in first and last authority, on seisin of a cardinal.

4. A public figure is a council, a duchy, a religious order of pontifical right, a public institution, or any other organized association.

5. The instruction of the lawsuit is ensured, in secrecy, by one of the members of the pontifical court indicated to this end by the Pope, or in his absence, in England and Scotland, by the cardinal chamberlain. This cardinal instructor joins together the evidence, questions the parties and the witnesses, and collects the consents. It judges appropriateness of the continuations and has the responsibility of drawing up, then of reading into the court record, the bill of indictment. It is not authorized to make use of interrogation.

6. The charge is carried out collectively by the pontifical court. It hears, in camera, the pleading of the defense, which has the right to be represented by an advocate under the same conditions as those described in article 3 subparagraph 7.

7. The entirety of the file of instruction must be communicated to defense if it makes the request of it.

8. The judgments are given, after deliberation, by Sovereign pontiff, or in his absence in England and Scotland by the cardinal chamberlain. The deliberations are subject to the rule of the majority.

9. The judgment of the pontifical court is not subject to appeal, except special decision of Sovereign pontiff, or, in his absence in England and Scotland, of the Cardinal Chamberlain or the Camerlingue Cardinal of Rome.

10. The judgment must be given within one week after reading of the bill of indictment.

11. A judgment concerning a public figure touches in totality all the component members thereof, and the people declaring itself like such.

Art 5. High ecclesiastical Court of Justice

1. The high court has responsibility for the examination of the proper use of the procedures in use by the ordinary courts. It is guarantor of the good application of the provisions of the canon law.

2. The high court is composed of the entirety of the college of the cardinals.

3. The high court is seized by a cardinal when, in a determined cause, all the grounds for appeal are exhausted. A seisin of the high court does not suspend the administration of the punishment, except if the secular arm pronounced the judgment of pyre, in which case it must postpone to carry out it, while waiting for the decision of the high court.

4. The high court judges in law. It does not rest with this court to revise the legal qualification of the facts complained of once condemned. It controls only the procedural documents, and the proportion of the inflicted punishment.

5. The high court convenes in front of the presiding officer of the tribunal having pronounced the final judgment. This one must be present, in camera, a report justifying in right its decision.

6. The High Court of Justice makes its decisions in simple majority, one week, at most, after the presentation of the report. Its decisions are not subject to appeal. Its judgments are introduced as regulations for the good application of the canon law.

7. If the high court denounces a decision of an ordinary court, it has the obligation to reopen the file, and to rule in accordance with the recommendations of the high court.

Exceptional Justice

Art 6. Inquisition Tribunal

1. The inquisitors are itinerant judges who act within the framework of a commission of office of which the provisions are made public, in accordance with article 6 subparagraph 3.

2. The cardinals inquisitors name and revoke the inquisitors. In the English Speaking Pontifical Council, the cardinal inquisitor's responsability is carried out by the Roman Cardinal.

2-bis. The cardinal inquisitor in the ESPC can delegate his responsability to a Grand Inquisitor in England and Scotland, named and revoked by him. The Grand Inquisitor must inform the Cardinal Inquisitor of all instructions and activities of the Inquisition in England and Scotland. In the case of a Grand Inquisitor nomination, this one will take all responsabilities relevent to the cardinal inquisitor in the canon law below

3. The cardinals inquisitors commission the inquisitors in publicly exposing the motivations leading to resort to the jurisdiction of exception.

4. The inquisitor seizes the same and conducts the instruction in secrecy. He joins together the evidence, questions the parties and the witnesses, collects the consents. He judges the appropriateness of the continuations and writes the bill of indictment. An officiality meeting already for the cause which the inquisitor has seized is, by law, stripped of the business that it has in examination, to the profit of the jurisdiction of exception.

5. The inquisitor can resort to the preliminary question or the great question, whenever only the consents of the defendant would make it possible to establish his culpability or his innocence. The administration of the question will have to result in neither death, nor any final infirmity.

6. The inquisitor alone presides over the lawsuit and carries out the charge. He hears, in public, the pleading of the defense, which has the right to an advocate under the same conditions as those described in article 3 subparagraph 7.

7. The entirety of the file of instruction must be communicated to defense once it makes the request of it.

8. The judgment is given by the inquisitor, and is not susceptible to appeal. Nevertheless, it may not fall to the inquisitor to decide the nature and amount of the punishment, but to the college of the assessors, in conformity with article 6 subparagraph 10.

9. If it has sole power of discretion, exclusive of any interference, the inquisitor must, as far as possible, associate the conduct of the lawsuit to the bishops of the dioceses to which relates its territorial competence defined by the act of commission of office.

10. At the time that the inquisitorial judgment is given publicly, college of assessors will be formed, composed of: of the cardinal inquisitor having affixed his seal on the act of commission, of an inquisitor not having informed on or judged the cause, and of the bishop of the diocese on which the lawsuit is held. This college has the responsibility of ruling, according to the principle of the majority, on the nature and the amount of punishment which it is advisable to inflict on the condemned.


Art 7. The minutes of the lawsuits held in front of the ecclesiastical courts of justice must be compiled and preserved in the files of the congregation of the inquiry.


Art 8. The cardinals inquisitors guarantee their guise as an organization of the special services of the Church, in collaboration with the Holy Armies and the congregation for the businesses of the world.
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